Monday, May 29, 2017

The New Pornographers Perform "Whiteout Conditions," "High Ticket Attractions," "Colosseums," and "Avalanche Alley"

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The Beer Tanks Cometh

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Frank Deford, Rest in Peace

I was surprised to hear of his sudden retirement a few weeks back; this explains it — Frank Deford, NPR's Longtime Philosopher Of Sports, Dies At 78. An example of his writing:
    Baseball or Football? We can reflect, but there is one answer

    Jacques Barzun, the esteemed cultural historian, lived a hundred and four years and wrote multitude of words about the most important issues in society, but when he died last week, his one quotation that was invariably cited was a pithy one that he wrote back in 1954:

    "Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball."

    Never mind that that is no longer even remotely true.

    For, yes, as the World Series began with its lowest television ratings ever, it was even more evident that football is now far and away our national game. Baseball was the national pastime, but nobody would dare call football a pantywaist thing like "pastime."

    Of course, all sorts of treatises have been written comparing the two sports, but none has been so brilliant as the comic routine that the late George Carlin developed, in which he described baseball as a "nineteenth century pastoral game" and football as a "twentieth century technological struggle" . . . as he went on to contrast the two, using a harsh, gruff voice for the gridiron ---- "in football you wear a helmet" ---- and a sweet, near-falsetto for the diamond: "in baseball you wear a cap."

    But Mr. Barzun's death, which obliquely served to turn his famous old observation into an epitaph for baseball's preeminence, does make us wonder why football has supplanted baseball so in popularity. Especially: does it tell us anything about ourselves? Or as Mary McGrory, the late Pulitzer-Prize-winning columnist, framed it most succinctly back when football was ascending:

    "Baseball is what we used to be. Football is what we have become."

    So: do we love football more because the essence of football is brutality, and we are now a more violent people? Or does the fact that football is easier to bet account for our greater fondness for it? Or maybe, above all, is it simply that football eclipsed baseball because it is so perfect for television?

    It is ironic, too, that even as women have become so much more involved in sport, football is the one retrograde game which is played almost exclusively by boys and men. Might football not be that twenty-first century technological struggle after all, but instead, at heart, a subversive vestige of the male-centric past?

    Whatever, indisputably, football remains uniquely our game, even as so much else in the cultural world ---- music, movies, video, video games, fashion . . . and most sport, too ---- catches on all over the world. However, except perhaps across the border with our Canadian cousins, no one else plays what is knowingly dismissed as American football.

    Talk about United States exceptionalism in this America-first election year. Baseball is still an extremely popular entertainment, but ... whoever wants to know the taste and passion of America had better learn football.

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Saturday, May 27, 2017

Tim Darcy Performs "Still Waking Up," "Joan Pt. 1, 2," "Sledgehammer And The Rose," & "What'd You Release?"


"Tim Darcy has a gifted voice, with a delivery that triggers the Lou Reed and Roy Orbison pleasure centers of my brain," writes blurbist Bob Boilen. I hear what could be music for a David Lynch soundtrack. Mr. Boilen continues, "The words he delivers are mysterious and mellifluous.... Darcy grew up in Arizona writing poetry as a kid, eventually making his way to Colorado, then New Hampshire, before falling creatively into a life in Montreal," all Lynchian locales.

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Ralph Nader's Libertarian Argument Against Nuclear Power


"The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) relied on faulty analysis to justify its refusal to adopt a critical measure for protecting Americans from the occurrence of a catastrophic nuclear-waste fire at any one of dozens of reactor sites around the country, according to an article in the May 26 issue of Science magazine" — US nuclear regulators greatly underestimate potential for nuclear disaster.

Cue the man who got my vote in '08, Old Right Nader, who made the case that such nonsense is impossible in a free economy, quoted in an old post of mine — Atomic Corporate Socialism — as observing that "the atomic power industry does not give up... as long as Uncle Sam can be dragooned to be its subsidizing, immunizing partner." He continued:
    For sheer brazenness, ... the atomic power lobbyists know few peers. They remember, as the previous Atomic Energy Commission told them decades ago, that one significant meltdown could contaminate “an area the size of Pennsylvania.”

    They know that no insurance companies will insure them at any price, which is why the Price-Anderson Act hugely limits nuclear plants’ liability in case of massive damages to people, property, land and water.

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Thursday, May 25, 2017

J.S. Bach's Lobet Gott in Seinen Reichen Performed by Hannah Morrison, Meg Bragle, Nicholas Mulroy, Peter Harvey, the Monteverdi Choir, the English Baroque Soloists, Directed by Sir John Eliot Gardiner

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A Reason Not to Toast Genesee's New Beer Tanks


A stoked as I am to see these tanks in a couple of days, I have had the same question that local patriot Con Cazentre raises — Could an Upstate NY firm have built the China-made beer tanks floating past its factory? The article in its entirety:
    LITTLE FALLS, NY -- Today a set of huge beer fermentation tanks destined for the Genesee Brewery in Rochester will float down the Erie Canal past a factory in Little Falls.

    They will pass just 100 feet or so in front of a plant owned by Feldmeier Equipment, a Syracuse-based company that makes stainless tanks similar to those heading to the brewery in Rochester.

    But the 12 big beer tanks on the canal weren't made by Feldmeier, or even by an American company. They were made by a company called the Lehui Group in China and shipped 6,000 miles, ending with a 225-mile journey along the canal (they're too big to move by truck).

    The tanks are a key part of a $49 million modernization project currently underway at the Genesee Brewery on St. Paul Street in Rochester. Of the total project cost, $40 million is being paid by Genesee's parent company, North American Breweries, and, in its later stages, about $9.5 million will come in aid from New York state.

    And that's the part that doesn't sit well with the folks at Feldmeier.

    Feldmeier bid on parts of the project, though Genesee executives said the Syracuse company "chose not to bid" specifically on the big tanks moving down the canal.

    "We submitted a proposal and we were not successful, unfortunately," said Dave Pollock, vice president of sales at Feldmeier's office in Syracuse. "That happens in manufacturing, and we know that."

    "Our issue," Pollock said, "is they're getting $9.5 million from the state for this project. And they're asking people to come down and toast the tanks on the canal that are coming from China. And we have employees to feed here."

    Feldmeier has roughly 200 employees in Syracuse, and about 100 at two plants in Little Falls. It has other plants in Alabama, Iowa and Nevada, with about 425 total employees, he said.

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白左

That's "SJW" in Chinese — "Baizuo" Is The New Derogatory Term Millions Of Chinese Are Using To Describe America's "White Left" Regressive Liberals. Leave it to the Chinese to come up with the most succinct definition yet of the SJW:
    Although the emphasis varies, baizuo is used generally to describe those who “only care about topics such as immigration, minorities, LGBT and the environment” and “have no sense of real problems in the real world”; they are hypocritical humanitarians who advocate for peace and equality only to “satisfy their own feeling of moral superiority”; they are “obsessed with political correctness” to the extent that they “tolerate backwards Islamic values for the sake of multiculturalism”; they believe in the welfare state that “benefits only the idle and the free riders”; they are the “ignorant and arrogant westerners” who “pity the rest of the world and think they are saviours”.

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Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Morrissey Performs "There Is A Light That Never Goes Out"


The finale from Who Put the M in Manchester? to honor a Mancunian who dares speak truth to cowards in power — Morrissey Rips British Politicians after Manchester Attack: ‘Petrified’ to Admit Islamic Extremism Behind Terror. "The anger is monumental," said The Smiths frontman, asking, "For what reason will this ever stop?" He continued:
    Theresa May says such attacks "will not break us", but her own life is lived in a bullet-proof bubble, and she evidently does not need to identify any young people today in Manchester morgues. Also, "will not break us" means that the tragedy will not break her, or her policies on immigration. The young people of Manchester are already broken - thanks all the same, Theresa. Sadiq Khan says "London is united with Manchester", but he does not condemn Islamic State - who have claimed responsibility for the bomb. The Queen receives absurd praise for her "strong words" against the attack, yet she does not cancel today's garden party at Buckingham Palace - for which no criticism is allowed in the Britain of free press. Manchester mayor Andy Burnham says the attack is the work of an "extremist". An extreme what? An extreme rabbit?

    In modern Britain everyone seems petrified to officially say what we all say in private. Politicians tell us they are unafraid, but they are never the victims. How easy to be unafraid when one is protected from the line of fire. The people have no such protections.
Never that big of a fan of the man's music, I never thought I'd say he looks tough:


Hilarious how Spin tries to spin the story — Morrissey Says Something Predictably Dumb About the Manchester Bombing — and horribly fails, as this sampling of comments, edited for punctuation and grammar, shows:
    Dumb? It was the wisest statement of the day. Fuck you, SPIN.

    [....]

    Agreed. Who the hell is this dumb journalist?

    [....]

    Agree. Morrissey's statement didn't seem 'jumbled' at all to me - indeed, Morrissey was more to the point than any of the deluded multiculturalists or cowed establishment.

    [....]

    Plain words with plain meanings scare some people.

    [....]

    Manly words from a British man.

    [....]

    One of the few celebrities to say how we actually feel.

    Of course the liberal press would shoot him down for daring to mention the elephant in the room.

    Contrast his sincere heartfelt sentiment with the usual virtue signalling from those privileged enough to not have to experience the cultural enrichment of having your child slaughtered in the street such as author Jamie Tworkowski, "Thought of the Day: I would rather hang out with Muslims and refugees than alt-right white Twitter trolls."

    [....]

    Why is he being "dumb"? He has the right to express the frustration that many people are feeling right now. Politicians (also from Brussels) wants open borders, because they are not like common people, who are the ones who suffers this kind of violence at first hand. If you people keep delusional be ready to say goodbye to your most beloved freedoms. We are dealing with something never seen since Nazism...

    [....]

    Morrissey nailed it. Unlike the idiots at Spin.

    [....]

    You know what, I didn't used to like Morrissey....until now.

    [....]

    Someone give him a position in the government!

    [....]

    What the hell was "dumb" about that? We are ALL targets for these trash! They want to kill us all and all we get is hand wringing, empty gestures, futile hashtags, and dumb leftists finger wagging and condemning those who dare to speak out against what is going on thanks to the tyranny of political correctness. 22 people, some of them kids, lie DEAD in the MORGUE, their bodies ripped and torn apart. Angry? Damned right we are! Stop your empty, futile virtue signalling and let's start recognising this for what it is! War!

    [....]

    Dumb? You mean his genuine, logical reaction to yet another mass slaughter in Europe? Love and prayers won't reform the cancerous ideology behind these acts. Logging on social media and posting some cookie-cutter response that a PR expert wrote doesn't do shit to address the issue and it doesn't engage the public in any way. Should be pretty obvious by now that both left and right-leaning citizens in Europe want an end to mass-scale immigration and crime at the hands of immigrants. The longer you useful idiots in media try to deflect, the worse the backlash against you (and the state) will be.

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A Real War on Women Comes to the West

And even NPR and Slate cannot deny that the Mancunian "girls are survivors of an orchestrated attack on girls and girlhood, a massive act of gender-based violence" — Why I Think The Manchester Attack Was Aimed At Women And Girls. Perhaps the author as a Goan was given a pass, or perhaps libruls are waking up to the fact that they'll lose the most by letting that Libyan loser's loser civilization take over their own.

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Monday, May 22, 2017

Ariana Grande Performs "Right There"


We are all Ariana Grande fans — Ariana Grande 'in hysterics' as death toll grows to 19 amid suspected terrorist attack at her Manchester concert. May God rest the souls of the deceased and heal the injured.

Actually, we are not all fans of Ariana Grande, who "was raised a Roman Catholic but abandoned Catholicism during the reign of Pope Benedict XVI, citing opposition to the church's stance on homosexuality." Still, we need to defend her right to make a killing selling crappy music, the rights of young girls to waste their money buying it and attending her concerts without being targeted with nail bombs, and her right to abandon Catholicism for whatever spurious, ill-informed, reason and not be executed for apostasy. In short, we need to defend our way of life. (By the way, she's Italian not Latina, if that even makes any sense.)

We need to move beyond the silly sentiments of the "we are all" and "nous sommes tous" statements to cold resolve to, as our president said just yesterday, "Drive. Them. Out" — Here's the full transcript of Trump's speech to Middle East leaders in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Speaking of the speech, while I am not happy that our president chose as his first foreign visit two of the most odious regimes on this earth (he should have gone to Russia), I was impressed by the grand theater of speaking to the leaders of 50 Muslim nations and visiting the Wailing Wall, if only for the confusion such moves will sow among his domestic enemies.

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Friday, May 19, 2017

Sarah Jarosz & Aoife O'Donovan Perform "Some Tyrant"

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The Clinton Crime Family's Last Victims?

The victim in this largely ignored story "made contact with WikiLeaks through Gavin MacFadyen, a now-deceased American investigative reporter" — Murdered DNC Staffer Seth Rich Shared 44,053 Democrat Emails with WikiLeaks: Report.

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A Hard Left Defense of the President

    Is there some problem with notifying Russia—or anyone else, for that matter—of an Islamic State threat to blow up civilian aircraft with laptop bombs? Is the idea that we’re supposed to sit back and let it happen? What sane person wouldn’t be glad this warning was given to Russia, and wouldn’t want Russia to give it to us if the circumstances were reversed? Is this not a routine exchange of threat information in a closed principals’ meeting?

    Besides, was there really any great secret here?
So asks CounterPunch's Jim Kavanagh, who notes "the game has changed: Donald Trump has been accused of betraying Israel" — Fast and Furious: Now They’re Really Gunning for Trump.

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Here Come the Beer Tanks!


Read all about it — Genesee beer tanks on the Erie Canal: The week-long trek starts Friday.
    The set of huge beer tanks destined for The Genesee Brewery in Rochester are expected to begin their week-long journey over the New York Canal System on Friday.

    The 20-foot by 60-foot tanks, too large to be trucked down the state Thruway, have been held up for about a week in a port on the Hudson River south of Albany. The delay was due to high water in the canal system caused by recent record rainfall.

    Barges carrying the tanks will enter the state canal system at the Waterford lock north of Albany at 11 a.m. Friday. The trip to the Genesee Brewery on the old "Erie Canal" is expected to take six to seven days.

    Genesee Brewery is encouraging fans of its beers to toast the tanks as they float down the canal, and soon will release an estimated timetable showing when and where they can be seen.

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SS. Peter and Paul Church




"You can see the church from most places in the village" in the town next door to the one I grew up in — A day in Hamburg: Photo essay of people, places in Upstate NY village.

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Hysterosalpingography

An ethical alternative to test-tube babies — 100-year-old fertility technique reduces need for IVF.

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Ripe for Full-Scale Human Colonization?


The peninsula above "will be a much greener place in the future" — Antarctic has seen widespread change in last 50 years, moss study reveals.

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Saturday, May 13, 2017

Red Baraat Perform "Bhangale," "Bhangra Pirates," "Holi Ked In" and "Rang Barse"


Performing shorty after Holi, the last time this band whose leader has local roots appeared on these pages, wearing the same get-ups and performing several of the same numbers — Red Baraat Perform "Sialkot," "Zindabad," "Bhangale," & "Se Hace Camino" .

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Hannah Lopa for Miss U.S.A.

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Men Like Melania


As the above photo accompanying this article shows — Trump and First Lady Celebrate Mother’s Day with Military Spouses and Families. The guy on the far right (far right, haha) even seems to be checking out the First Derrière.

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Did the B.V.M. Defeat XXth Century Global Communism?


On today's centennial of the first apparition of Our Lady of Fátima, reading this article, one can come away with that interpretation, although not the author's intention — Our Lady of Political Anxiety. Suggesting the "wave of Marian apparitions in the United States in the 1940s and ‘50s reveals as much about Cold War anxieties as it does about religious devotion," the author writes:
    Like Fátima, the sightings gave rise to Marian cults that gained international renown—and they have much to teach about how American Catholics experienced the Cold War. “Marian cults provided the Church with an opportunity to link the need for supernatural help for individual anxieties with its larger collective and political goals,” write Kselman and Avella. They suggest that these events foreshadow Catholic involvement in the anti-Communist hysteria that would follow. In order to truly understand the Cold War from the American perspective, they write, it’s important to take Catholics’ religious practices into consideration. The way we worship reveals a lot about the things we fear the most.
Libruls love to attribute "fear" and "hysteria" to those who disagree with their pogram, I mean program. I take the quote about "Marian cults provid[ing] the Church with an opportunity to link the need for supernatural help for individual anxieties with its larger collective and political goals" literally and supernaturally. Of course, this is not to deny the roles played by Ronal_Reagan, Baroness Margaret Thatcher, and St. Pope John Paul II.

I'm reminded of an episode from The Spanish Civil War by Hugh Thomas, Baron Thomas of Swynnerton, whom Wikipedia tells me passed away a week ago today (rest in peace), in which the Franquista promoted a local stature of the B.V.M. to the rank of general after a decisive battle, news that caused the German chancellor at the time to refused to ever to set foot in the country again.

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The Study of Old English Is "Troubling" and "Problematic"


A tenured SJW writes, "In 2017, as the American neo-Nazi movement that calls itself the 'alt-right' is resurrecting medievally tinged celebrations of 'European heritage' as part of its racist agenda'" — Old English Has a Serious Image Problem.

The article's subheadings include "The Gendered History of Learning Old English" and "Troubling Racial Connotations." We learn, "Long before the Black Lives Matter movement on campuses across the country called for a more inclusive, more diverse curriculum, the discipline of medieval studies had been working toward the establishment of a 'multicultural Middle Ages,' a way out from under the field’s reputation as thoroughly dead, white, and male."

Spare us! Is no field of study safe from Cultural Marxism?

Back in the early '90s, a black campus friend asked me what I thought of the Afrocentrism gaining so much ground on campuses. Meaning no ill will (I did not yet know understand I was a Reactionary and still thought of myself a Radical), I answered honestly that it was having me look more closely into my European cultural heritage. Probably not the answer he expected.

At the time, I had been reading the likes of Malcolm X and Eldridge Cleaver. From them and others I remember reading that to deny a people of its past is to deny them a present and a future. Is this not what Cultural Marxism aims for us? Black nationalism has much to teach us.

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Métropolisation: How Globalization Engenders Populism

A French geographer "give[s] an explanation for the rise of the Front National that goes beyond the usual imputation of stupidity or bigotry to its voters" and "tells us something important about British voters’ decision to withdraw from the European Union and the astonishing rise of Donald Trump" — The French fracture.
    Christophe Guilluy calls himself a geographer. But he has spent decades, as a housing consultant in various rapidly changing neighbourhoods north of Paris, studying gentrification, among other things. And he has crafted a convincing narrative tying together France’s various social problems – immigration tensions, inequality, deindustrialisation, economic decline, ethnic conflict and the rise of populist parties. Such an analysis had previously eluded the Parisian caste of philosophers, political scientists, literary journalists, government-funded researchers and party ideologues.
The analysis:
    At the heart of Guilluy’s inquiry is globalisation. Internationalising the division of labour has brought significant economic efficiencies. But it has also brought inequalities unseen for a century, demographic upheaval and cultural disruption. Now we face the question of what – if anything – we should do about it.

    A process that Guilluy calls métropolisation has cut French society in two. In 16 dynamic urban areas (Paris, Lyons, Marseilles, Aix-en-Provence, Toulouse, Lille, Bordeaux, Nice, Nantes, Strasbourg, Grenoble, Rennes, Rouen, Toulon, Douai-Lens and Montpellier), the world’s resources have proved a profitable complement to those found in France. These urban areas are home to all the country’s leading educational and financial institutions, as well as almost all its corporations and the many well-paying jobs that go with them. Here, too, are the individuals – the entrepreneurs and engineers and CEOs, the fashion designers and models, the film directors and chefs and other “symbolic analysts”, as Robert Reich once called them – who shape the country’s tastes, form its opinions and renew its prestige.

    Cheap labour, tariff-free consumer goods and new markets of billions of people have made globalisation a windfall for such ­prosperous places. But globalisation has had no such galvanising effect on the rest of France. Cities that were lively for hundreds of years – Tarbes, Agen, Albi, Béziers – are now, to use Guilluy’s word, “desertified”, haunted by the empty shopfronts and blighted downtowns that Rust Belt Americans know well.

    Guilluy doubts that any place exists in France’s new economy for working people as we’ve previously understood them. Paris offers the most striking case. As it has prospered, the City of Light has stratified, resembling, in this regard, London or American cities such as New York and San Francisco. It’s a place for millionaires, immigrants, tourists and the young, with no room for the median Frenchman. Paris now drives out the people once thought of as synonymous with the city.

    Yet economic opportunities for those unable to prosper in Paris are lacking elsewhere in France. Journalists and politicians assume that the stratification of France’s flourishing metropoles results from a glitch in the workings of globalisation. Somehow, the rich parts of France have failed to impart their magical formula to the poor ones. Fixing the problem, at least for certain politicians and policy experts, involves coming up with a clever short cut: perhaps, say, if Romorantin had free wifi, its citizens would soon find themselves wealthy, too. Guilluy disagrees. For him, there is no reason to expect that Paris (and France’s other dynamic spots) will generate a new middle class, or to assume that broad-based ­prosperity will develop elsewhere in the country (which happens to be where the majority of the population live). If he is right, we can understand why every major Western country has seen the rise of political movements taking aim at the present system.
The Steve Sailers and John Derbyshires have been saying as much for years, but go ignored. Perhaps France's Overton window is opened a bit wider. More on that:
    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes 21st-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural”. It’s a controversial premise – that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together. Though this premise has been confirmed in much of the West for half a century, the assertion will shock many Americans, conditioned to place “inequality” (bad) and “diversity” (good) at opposite poles of a Manichaean moral order. This disconnect is a key reason American political discussions have turned so illogical and rancorous. Certain arguments – for instance, that raising the incomes of American workers requires limiting immigration – can be cast as either sensible or superstitious, legitimate or illegitimate, good or evil, depending on whether the person making them is deemed to be doing so on the grounds of economics or identity.
In America, even making the argument "on the grounds of economics" is deemed "superstitious," "illegitimate," and "evil," because such arguments are trumped by the "we're a nation of immigrants" article of faith.

"At a practical level," however, the author notes, "considerations of economics and ethnicity are getting harder to disentangle."

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Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Hector Berlioz's Grande Messe des Morts (or Requiem), performed by the Chœur de Radio France, the Maîtrise de Notre-Dame, Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France and the Orchestra Simón Bolívar, Directed by Gustavo Dudamel

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Saturday, May 6, 2017

Ben l'Oncle Soul Performs Otis Redding's "These Arms Of Mine"


Special dedication to Marion Maréchal-Le Pen and her aunt's victory this weekend.

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Genesis 5:2

"He created them male and female" — Researchers identify 6,500 genes that are expressed differently in men and women. The study "provides evidence that males and females undergo a sort of separate, but interconnected evolution."

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Forty Years Ago Sunday

A lot has been written about this show and the book about it — A Deadhead’s Insight: Cornell ‘77 stood for more than just a show. An excerpt:
    What happened May 8 that year — forever immortalized as “Grateful Dead Day” in the City of Ithaca — wasn’t simply one of the greatest shows the Dead ever played. In fact, whether the show was the best the band had ever played is still a topic of some debate among the most diehard members of the fan base. Some have even called it an overrated performance in the band’s history, a performance largely propped up by the mythology surrounding it.

    Understanding of this myth is the focus of Conners’ latest book, Cornell ’77: The Music, The Myth and the Magnificence of the Grateful Dead’s Concert at Barton Hall, published through Cornell University Press. Through 179 quick-reading pages, Conners explores not only the experience of that Barton Hall show through the eyes of those who attended, but he also explores the stories of the people involved in its happening: a study of the band itself during that point in time and in explaining the greater social implication of the show itself.

    Conners takes a deep dive into the social and cultural aspects of the Dead universe — from the taping subculture among its fan base to the band’s style of touring and performing — which leant itself to the immortality of that night’s performance. Cornell ‘77 is not simply a drawn-out review of a great concert: it is a deep analysis of why, even today, the show has maintained its status well beyond the borders of Ithaca 40 years later.

    Conners, a self-professed Deadhead and author of numerous tomes on music and the counterculture, approaches his subject with a reverent honesty. The book is as much a tribute as it is an anthropological survey of Grateful Dead culture and a true assessment of where the band was at that point in its history, taking into account not only the group’s mindset at the time but also where it stood creatively in ’77.
Here's a bootleg of the show — GRATEFUL DEAD : Historic Concert At Cornell University In 1977.

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Best News in Town

"We expect to see people on the banks of the canal capturing this special moment in our history," says Janine Schoos, associate marketing director at North American Breweries — New Genesee beer tanks coming via Erie Canal and So large they require a barge.

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Breaking Free

LewRockwell.com's Andrew Martin "document[s] some of the more obvious things that stood out to me after having been somewhat unplugged from the Matrix," which he "personally define[s]... as a set of beliefs, cultural norms, attitudes, and conditioned states which are pervasive throughout society" — 20 Indicators That Signal You May Be Living In The Matrix & How To Unplug Yourself.

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Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Marc-Antoine Charpentier's Messe Et Motets Pour La Vierge Performed by Le Concert des Nations, Directed by Jordi Savall

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James Thompson on Men's and Women's Brains

First explaining "a very interesting paper on sex differences in brain size and intelligence, notable for linking people’s brain scans with their detailed intelligence test results" — Women's Brains.

And from a few years ago, explaining a graph showing "that even when boys and girls have exactly the same levels of intellect, differences in the standard deviations have considerable impact at the extremes of intelligence" — Are Girls Too Normal? Sex Differences in Intelligence.

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On Its Bicentennial...

... "Clinton's Ditch" is still being put to good use — Genesee Brewing to float massive beer tanks 225 miles across NY via Erie Canal. This is something to look forward to and will be a sight to see.

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The Genocide That Dare Not Speak Its Name

The heroic Ilana Mercer on the "the most dangerous occupation in the world," whose members "suffer more murders per-capita than any other community on earth outside a war zone" — Damned Lies and Statistics About Black-on-White Farm Murders in South Africa.

Had this blogger's Netherlandish ancestors headed south instead of towards New Amsterdam, he'd be blogging now in Afrikaans, perhaps from Orania, Northern Cape, and not just contenting himself to read the entire œuvre of J. M. Coetzee.

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